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Monday, March 18, 2013

What a reduclous move of Indian author?

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Manto thought the violent forces that had been unleashed during that period would remain in Pakistan’s society, damaging it. In this piece he tells us the country would become increasingly violent unless the matter was taken up. It wasn’t, of course, and again Manto shows he is correct. He says the ‘age of barbarism’ in Pakistan has already begun – and he was writing this 60 years ago. As a writer his understanding of the solution is unusual, and he turns not to sociology but, unusually for him, to something more personal.
Qatal o khoon ki surkhiyan, by Saadat Hasan Manto, translated by Aakar Patel
Manto.
Manto.
The most prominent headlines these days are about murder and killings. So far as the stories go they are fine and must be reported. But one wonders why there’s so much killing happening in Pakistan.
Aggression is a part of man’s character, I accept that. What I’m asking is why it’s now, in these days, that there is so much of it.
Every morning’s paper is filled with the details of cruel acts. What’s behind all of this? Should we lose faith in humanity? Why have we become so bloodthirsty suddenly?
It’s difficult to figure out the answer to these questions. We thought that what happened during Partition that brought the human race to shame – the parading naked of helpless women, the murdering of lakhs of human beings, the raping of thousands of girls. We thought that after this the problem was behind us. That Partition would rid us of the hatred and the violence. But now we learn that the hatred has not been expended. It thrives.
What happened in the communal riots was explained away as group action. But now it’s clear that the violence is still with us. Every single day brings news of this.
We must ask ourselves why these people have become so violent. Why they are so intent on actions that do such damage to others. I think the intensity of the violence during Partition could have been reduced. Unfortunately nobody attempted to do this. The result is before us. We have hardened killers living in our midst. Their actions are being reported to us in the papers.
Their hands became familiar with dagger and pistol during the communal riots. What’s being done to control them now? The fact is that these people are a product of that event.
They weren’t used to killing, it is the circumstance that transformed them. They loved their mothers surely, and their friends. They understood the value of honour and respect for their wives and daughters. They feared god.
All of this, that one event obliterated. An event so bloody as never before witnessed.
What happened then is done and there’s little gain in analysing it. But it’s absolutely essential that we examine its fallout. The changes that have come because of it. This is not the work of judges, therefore, but of psychologists. They alone can investigate the phenomenon and produce some solution to it.
It’s troubling that our government is doing nothing about it though every single day, as I keep saying, brings news of violence.
One party confronts another, guns are pulled out, daggers are drawn and plunged in, soda bottles and rocks and whatever comes to hand is flung at the other side. It’s not clear where the administration disappears while this is happening. I don’t want to comment on the police. They are needed in stopping this, of course, but the primary work is that of psychological examination. Why is this happening at all?
If we don’t examine it psychologically, I fear the situation will become worse. An era of barbarism will begin in Pakistan. Will begin? Let me correct that – it’s begun.
What day passes without evidence of it? And it has been happening in the open. Another problem in preventing it is that the killers are people whom the witnesses fear. They worry for their own lives. It’s often happened that a man is killed in public. The police may even catch the killer and produce him in court. But then the witnesses are not supportive and the man gets away.
I’m no supporter of the death penalty. Indeed, I’m not even in favour of jail. I don’t think jail reforms people. I’m in favour of that which turns them normal again.
We often talk of saints and elders who with one word made terrible people repent. The most ordinary faqir in one meeting making the devil himself take the path of angels. So the soul is undoubtedly something that exists and can be influenced.
In this, our world of science when we understand atomic structure, it’s surely possible to examine ourselves, our soul, scientifically. Of course, we can’t dismiss those who approach the soul through namaz and roza and arti and kirtan. The soul is whole. And I’m convinced the way to reform the killers among us is through educating their souls.
They should realise that they can yet be saved. That they are ordinary men and it is it circumstance that made them monsters. They should realise also that it is man whom god made venerable and excellent. Whom he made the last prophet.
If they understood that about themselves, I’m quite certain they will reform. One incident has brought this lack of harmony. True. But we must be rid now of its fallout.
Where is our humanity? Where are its keepers?

All you need to know who is RamSing Raper of INIDA?

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The sudden death of prime accused in the horrific 16 December Delhi gangrape Ram Singh, who committed suicide inside Tihar jail, is likely to affect the outcome of the trial say lawyers and experts. Here is a quick look at who he is and what his role in the rape was.
Prime accused in Delhi gangrape case:
Ram Singh, the driver of the bus in which the horrific gangrape was carried out, was the main accused in the case.  Singh, instead of parking the white chartered bus with its owner, had kept the vehicle with him on the night of the incident, reportedly met the other accused for dinner and then took the bus to drive around Delhi.
Reuters
Reuters
The group picked up the 23-year-old woman and her male friend as they were attempting to travel home after watching a film together.  The bus was driven through the bustling south Delhi areas of Munirka, Vasant Vihar and Mahipalpur as the six men raped and tortured the girl and beat her friend, using iron rods and other weapons.
According to the police report, the attack lasted at least 45 minutes.
There were six attackers, one of whom claims to be a juvenile and is being tried separately. Each of the men raped the 23-year-old woman, with at least two taking turns driving the bus. They penetrated her with two metal rods, causing such severe internal injuries that doctors later found parts of her intestines floating freely inside her abdomen.
The couple was stripped, robbed and thrown off the bus near Mahipalpur.
After fighting for her life for almost a fortnight, the 23-year-old woman breathed her last in Singapore on 29 December.
What he reportedly told the police
Singh reportedly had told the police that he had brutally assaulted the 23-year-old woman because she had resisted his attempt to rape her and bitten him.
According to police sources, Singh was drunk and he lost his cool when the girl bit him. After he was bitten he and his friends started beating the girl and her male friend with iron rods.
He had also snatched three mobile phones belonging to the girl and her friend so that they could not dial anyone for help after being thrown from the bus.
Singh had reportedly told the police that he had tried to destroy the evidence by washing the bus and also asked his accomplices not to talk about the incident. He parked the bus at RK Puram and later took it to its owner in Noida.
It was reportedly based on Ram Singh’s confession that the police were able to arrest the others involved in the case, including his brother.
Ram Singh, with the four others, were charged with murder, gangrape, attempt to murder, kidnapping, unnatural offences, dacoity, hurting in committing robbery, destruction of evidence, criminal conspiracy and common intention under the Indian Penal Code.
Singh and the others in Tihar Jail had reportedly been assaulted by other inmates when they were taken in and had also been put on ‘suicide watch’.
His background
Singh was a bus driver, despite an accident in 2009 that fractured his right arm so badly that doctors had to insert a rod to support it. He appeared on a reality television show in a compensation dispute with a bus owner, who in turn accused Singh of “drunken, negligent and rash driving”.
Singh’s neighbours describe him as a heavy drinker with a bad temper. One young woman said he used to get embroiled in violent rows and a relative recalled a physical altercation with her husband.
A Mail Today report  documents Singh as being a ‘muscleman’ in the Ravi Dass camp area of RK Puram in Delhi, a pocket of shanties in an otherwise upper middle class neighbourhood. Known for his drunken brawls in the neighbourhood, he had even reportedly eloped with a married woman, only to return after she passed away.
However, his parents had tried to justify their son’s involvement in the heinous crime.
“They (Ram Singh and Mukesh) were not like this. In 20 years, they have never committed a crime. They must have been in bad company. As regards alcohol, that’s common among drivers,” Mangi Lal, the father of two of the accused, was quoted as saying in this Firstpost report.
Ram Singh had pleaded not guilty to the charges against him.
His death
Ram Singh died inside Tihar jail on 10 March. Prison authorities say he committed suicide using the clothes he was wearing to hang himself. The DG Prisons confirmed to CNN-IBN that Ram Singh committed suicide. However a magisterial inquiry has been launched into the incident, which is likely to impact the course of the trial. The death is also being seen as a major embarrassment to the Delhi police and Tihar jail officials.

THIS IS INDIA! WANT TO GO THERE?

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If you think that responsible countries should formally warn their women travelers of the high risk of rape they face in India, especially in the wake of the gangrape of a Swiss tourist in Madhya Pradesh, don’t be surprised.
Western countries have already issued travel advisories to their women travelers clearly telling them they are not safe in India; that they are at risk of being raped.
What a great image make-over for a super-power aspirant and the Incredible India campaigners. It’s incredibly shameful that in the whole of South Asia, it’s only India that has been singled out for this rape travel advisory! That too in a country that gets more than USD 120 billion every year from tourists.
A Swiss woman, center, who, according to police, was gang-raped by a group of eight men while touring by bicycle with her husband, is escorted by policewomen. AP
A Swiss woman, center, who, according to police, was gang-raped by a group of eight men while touring by bicycle with her husband, is escorted by policewomen. AP
Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka don’t have the size and money to come anywhere close to India. On paper, they may be more lawless and crisis-ridden too, but the men in those countries do not pounce on women the way we do in India, and the rest of the world are more relaxed in advising their women while they travel there.
But guess what? 85 percent of South Asia is India and therefore, India’s taint besmirches the whole of the region. The rest of South Asia, for once, should be ashamed of India!
There are only very few countries in the world that carry such an ignominy. Even Papua New Guinea, which appears to be India’s cousin in its pastime of raping women, carries a less severe advisory.
This is what the UK tells its citizens of the rape-risks in India:
“Women should use caution if travelling alone in India. Reported cases of sexual assault against women and young girls are increasing; recent sexual attacks against female visitors in tourist areas and cities show that foreign women are also at risk. British women have been the victims of sexual assault in Goa, Delhi, Bangalore and Rajasthan and women travellers often receive unwanted attention in the form of verbal and physical harassment by individuals or groups of men.”
And what does America tell its women travellers?
“While India is generally safe for foreign visitors, according to the latest figures by Indian authorities, rape is the fastest growing crime in India. Among large cities, Delhi experienced the highest number of crimes against women. Although most victims have been local residents, recent sexual attacks against female visitors in tourist areas underline the fact that foreign women are at risk and should exercise vigilance.”
The advisory goes on to add that women can be “Eve-teased”, subjected to sexual harassment that can be frightening, and there could be “sexually suggestive lewd comments to catcalls to outright groping.”
“Women should observe stringent security precautions, including avoiding use of public transport after dark without the company of known and trustworthy companions, restricting evening entertainment to well-known venues, and avoiding isolated areas when alone at any time of day.”
Why the heck should any woman travel to India in such scary conditions? Just to be shut up in their hotel rooms or eat, pray and love? It’s better, perhaps, to go to the Central African Republic.
Last month, even Switzerland had advised its women to be careful in India, but perhaps the tourist in Madhya Pradesh fell for the romantic allure of India’s lawlessness and hopelessness, which some philosophise as mystic chaos. Almost exactly how we are adept in reconciling with our abject poverty as part of our spiritual being, some have even started philosophising on rapes.
The western countries have now realised that the risks of rape in India are real. Rape of women appears to be a national pastime. The Delhi gangrape had provoked an unprecedented citizens’ response in the national capital and the states, but that didn’t make any impact on the situation.
Delhi alone reported at least two rapes every day in the two months following the gangrape. There were equally horrendous incidents of rapes from different parts of the country, which are still continuing. Going by the number so far, perhaps we might surpass last year’s rape-tally of 24,000.
In the case of Madhya Pradesh, the Swiss national will be just a speck because it anyway accounts of 14 per cent of the country’s rapes.
Right now, we are in the middle of legislating a tough law to protect women against sexual violence. Will this law make any difference to the safety of women in India?
Mostly unlikely, because, as we argued earlier, the sexual violence against women has to be looked at in the context of the overall lawlessness and gender-inequality that prevails in India. No law will be able to address this. It will require a fundamental social transformation, wherein rule of law and equal rights to women is a reality.
But, this will be bad news for our politicians and hence is unlikely to happen.
The new law might scare some people, but as post-Delhi evidence shows, nothing is likely to change in terms of the risk of women to sexual violence and rapes because majority of our rapists or potential rapists won’t even know the gravity of their criminality and its consequences.
A Haus Khas student didn’t think twice before spiking an overseas girl’s drink and raping her last month even as the national media was abuzz with post-Delhi outrage. Neither was a resort manager in Bhopal deterred from raping a south Korean girl in the same month.
Even from a narrow perspective of making the new law work, the state and central governments should undertake an extraordinary nationwide campaign against this phenomenon just as it took on polio or AIDS. It should tell people from every possible outlet and street-corner that they will be in jail if they aggress women. The government needs to spend at least a couple of billion dollars for a few years at a stretch on this because it is an extraordinary epidemic that needs an extraordinary response.

THIS IS INDIA!

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The gang-rape of the Swiss tourist in Orchha, Madhya Pradesh was front page news in newspapers across the country. The reverberations of the shocking story were felt well outside India’s borders. Even friends from as far away as California, emailed me the story.
But while going through the newspaper, it  was an inside page that shocked me even more.
Under the headline of news about the Nation, there were eight stories. Six of them were about violence against women.
Apart from the rape of the Swiss tourist in Madhya Pradesh, a two-year-old girl was raped by a ward boy in Shajapur district in Madhya Pradesh while her mother was delivering another child. A villager heard the child’s screams and rescued her.
A 16-year-old girl from Moradabad set herself on fire after being allegedly molested by three boys. She died on Saturday at Delhi’s Safdarjung Hospital.
A 37-year-old woman who worked as a labourer got on a bus near Indore on Friday and was raped by the bus conductor, the driver and a passenger when it reached the terminal point. The passenger was allegedly drunk.
A 24-year-old researcher pursuing a Ph. D. in nanotechnology was found murdered in her lab in Agra with multiple stab wounds. Police said she had been tortured for about 30 minutes and are not ruling out sexual assault.
Protests following the Delhi gangrape incident. Reuters.
Protests following the Delhi gangrape incident. Reuters.
A 20-year-old girl died in Katni district in MP (again) when a youth whose marriage proposal had been rejected by her parents set her on fire.  That was a sidebar to a story where Chief Justice of India Altamas Kabir warned against the “baying for blood” that is the “knee-jerk” reaction to these gangrapes.
Whether the media now has an unofficial “rape beat” or whether the December 16 gangrape has forced it to suddenly pay more attention to stories that were always there, one thing is tragically clear from this collection – rape is not an exceptional crime in this country. Nor is the harassment of women in public places.
“I feel like I’m living in a human zoo, a wandering attraction that invites attention, all of it unwanted,” writes Sarah Elizabeth Webb in The Hindu. “I can’t get up and move to a separate part of my cage to escape the negative attention because in my cage, there are no bars and the men simply follow.” That column was written before the Swiss woman’s rape, when the issue at hand was more about gaping and groping. But even Webb admits that for all the Hollywood stereotypes about the promiscuous Western woman “sexual harassment and sexual assault are not a unique experience to Western women in India.” It happens “across the board.”
The Swiss woman’s rape, which made frontpage headlines, was remarkable only because the victim was a Swiss woman. Her story is nightmarish but not so rare. The Madhya Pradesh  home minister Uma Shankar Gupta’s bland bureaucratic response is predictable, pushing the blame, yet again, towards the victim.
She didn’t follow the laws he said. As foreign tourists they were supposed to inform the police about their whereabouts. And he trotted out that same worn banal platitude that Manish Tewari of the Congress had managed to come up with after the Delhi gangrape – “unfortunate”.
“What happened is unfortunate for our nation,” said Gupta.
The subtext is it is “unfortunate” for our nation because now our Eat, Pray, Love image abroad is turning into Eat, Pray, Rape. It is truly  “unfortunate” because that crime is so unexceptional. The real shocker here is that this keeps happening over and
The gang-rape of the Swiss tourist in Orchha, Madhya Pradesh was front page news in newspapers across the country. The reverberations of the shocking story were felt well outside India’s borders. Even friends from as far away as California, emailed me the story.
But while going through the newspaper, it  was an inside page that shocked me even more.
Under the headline of news about the Nation, there were eight stories. Six of them were about violence against women.
Apart from the rape of the Swiss tourist in Madhya Pradesh, a two-year-old girl was raped by a ward boy in Shajapur district in Madhya Pradesh while her mother was delivering another child. A villager heard the child’s screams and rescued her.
A 16-year-old girl from Moradabad set herself on fire after being allegedly molested by three boys. She died on Saturday at Delhi’s Safdarjung Hospital.
A 37-year-old woman who worked as a labourer got on a bus near Indore on Friday and was raped by the bus conductor, the driver and a passenger when it reached the terminal point. The passenger was allegedly drunk.
A 24-year-old researcher pursuing a Ph. D. in nanotechnology was found murdered in her lab in Agra with multiple stab wounds. Police said she had been tortured for about 30 minutes and are not ruling out sexual assault.
Protests following the Delhi gangrape incident. Reuters.
Protests following the Delhi gangrape incident. Reuters.
A 20-year-old girl died in Katni district in MP (again) when a youth whose marriage proposal had been rejected by her parents set her on fire.  That was a sidebar to a story where Chief Justice of India Altamas Kabir warned against the “baying for blood” that is the “knee-jerk” reaction to these gangrapes.
Whether the media now has an unofficial “rape beat” or whether the December 16 gangrape has forced it to suddenly pay more attention to stories that were always there, one thing is tragically clear from this collection – rape is not an exceptional crime in this country. Nor is the harassment of women in public places.
“I feel like I’m living in a human zoo, a wandering attraction that invites attention, all of it unwanted,” writes Sarah Elizabeth Webb in The Hindu. “I can’t get up and move to a separate part of my cage to escape the negative attention because in my cage, there are no bars and the men simply follow.” That column was written before the Swiss woman’s rape, when the issue at hand was more about gaping and groping. But even Webb admits that for all the Hollywood stereotypes about the promiscuous Western woman “sexual harassment and sexual assault are not a unique experience to Western women in India.” It happens “across the board.”
The Swiss woman’s rape, which made frontpage headlines, was remarkable only because the victim was a Swiss woman. Her story is nightmarish but not so rare. The Madhya Pradesh  home minister Uma Shankar Gupta’s bland bureaucratic response is predictable, pushing the blame, yet again, towards the victim.
She didn’t follow the laws he said. As foreign tourists they were supposed to inform the police about their whereabouts. And he trotted out that same worn banal platitude that Manish Tewari of the Congress had managed to come up with after the Delhi gangrape – “unfortunate”.
“What happened is unfortunate for our nation,” said Gupta.
The subtext is it is “unfortunate” for our nation because now our Eat, Pray, Love image abroad is turning into Eat, Pray, Rape. It is truly  “unfortunate” because that crime is so unexceptional. The real shocker here is that this keeps happening over and over again, that even two-year-olds aren’t safe in a hospital.
That even after all the outrage over the Delhi gangrape in a bus what looks like a copycat rape happens in another bus. At least when it comes to follow-up, the Swiss woman is a little luckier than most. Her story became front-page news unlike the labourer in the Indore bus. An English-speaking academic was found to translate for the Swiss couple in the little town on whose outskirts she was raped. Six culprits have been quickly nabbed and the police say they have confessed to the crime.
Kader Khan, the main accused in the Park Street rape case from February 2012 in Kolkata is still missing though that trial is underway. No one has yet been arrested in the case of the three young sisters who were allegedly raped and thrown into the well in Bhandara.
Now a forensic report is contradicting the post-mortem report and saying the girls were not raped. Either way they are dead. And no one has been arrested. “The first day when we filed the complaint, the police didn’t act on it,” their mother told the media. “Had they looked for the girls, my girls would have been found.”
It’s not that the outrage over December 16 or the law the cabinet is trying to thrash out in an all-party meeting will be a magic wand that will suddenly turn rape into a rare and exceptional crime. But if the reaction from the authorities to an allegation of rape is quick, decisive and stops blaming the victim, that will be more than a step forward.
We should not be ashamed about what happened to the Swiss woman because she was a foreigner. The real shame is that an entire page in the newspaper is filled with stories about violence against women, stories from across the board, from a 2–year-old to a labourer to a Ph. D. student. And those were only the ones that were reported over one weekend.
over again, that even two-year-olds aren’t safe in a hospital.
That even after all the outrage over the Delhi gangrape in a bus what looks like a copycat rape happens in another bus. At least when it comes to follow-up, the Swiss woman is a little luckier than most. Her story became front-page news unlike the labourer in the Indore bus. An English-speaking academic was found to translate for the Swiss couple in the little town on whose outskirts she was raped. Six culprits have been quickly nabbed and the police say they have confessed to the crime.
Kader Khan, the main accused in the Park Street rape case from February 2012 in Kolkata is still missing though that trial is underway. No one has yet been arrested in the case of the three young sisters who were allegedly raped and thrown into the well in Bhandara.
Now a forensic report is contradicting the post-mortem report and saying the girls were not raped. Either way they are dead. And no one has been arrested. “The first day when we filed the complaint, the police didn’t act on it,” their mother told the media. “Had they looked for the girls, my girls would have been found.”
It’s not that the outrage over December 16 or the law the cabinet is trying to thrash out in an all-party meeting will be a magic wand that will suddenly turn rape into a rare and exceptional crime. But if the reaction from the authorities to an allegation of rape is quick, decisive and stops blaming the victim, that will be more than a step forward.
We should not be ashamed about what happened to the Swiss woman because she was a foreigner. The real shame is that an entire page in the newspaper is filled with stories about violence against women, stories from across the board, from a 2–year-old to a labourer to a Ph. D. student. And those were only the ones that were reported over one weekend.

 
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